Power to the alternate memory of history

Do Not Say We Have Nothing, is the most ambitious novel I’ve so far read this year. Madeleine Thien’s 2016 Man Booker finalist is not only ambitious in its narrative structure but also in its memorialization and retelling of the Cultural Revolution of Mao Zedong’s communist regime. Lovers of fat… Read more

Share Button
Read full story Comments { 0 }

I’m not Whining, I’m just sayin’ it’s the illusion of competence

In all my blogging years, this, I think is the first blog post I’m writing from a teaching perspective. I’ll make it short. I’ve always preferred to blog as a writer, reader, book reviewer, and so on, but strange events  over the past few days have made me reflect on my work as a teaching… Read more

Share Button
Read full story Comments { 0 }

Remind Me of What We Have

Today is the last day of class and it coincides with the passing on of my father. Exactly one year. I’m filled with warmth and gratitude for all the love and comforting presences of my friends and family. There’s this phrase playing in my head again and again: Remind me of what we have. I find… Read more

Share Button
Read full story Comments { 0 }

Colson Whitehead’s Underground Railroad Invites Us to Commune with the Past

This book will break your heart            then mend it                       and break it again.The history of slavery is a loaded cannon but Colson softens the blow without diminishing the cruel realities of that era by converting the metaphor of the “underground railroad”… Read more

Share Button
Read full story Comments { 0 }

Remembering Okla Elliott

Non-stop news of death and dying this week and last week. When that starts to overwhelm I wonder why my friends are dying. Why seemingly everyone I know as a friend, family or colleague is losing a family member or friend. The air is pregnant with death I cannot wait for it to break. I anxiously… Read more

Share Button
Read full story Comments { 0 }

The first Christmas without Dad

Lights at the ArboretumThis is the first Christmas without Dad. I thought I was going to be strong. I’m trying to be strong. As early as September, the time I normally book my ticket home, I realized I didn’t want to go home for the first time in many years and I knew why. Dad was my Christmas… Read more

Share Button
Read full story Comments { 3 }

Fires, Rattlesnakes and Bear Burrito

Saturday, October 29, 2016. the theme here is vibrancyThis was supposed to be a short hike so I could return home in time for an evening party that involved spinning fires. The weather was awesome–upper 70’s with a chance to hit 80, and when you’re in the trees, it’s nice and warm since you get… Read more

Share Button
Read full story Comments { 0 }

Celebrations

Sukkoth/Sukkot/SukkahWe just celebrated the turning of mapleswith mapleshapedcookiesthe hopicecreamand appleciderIt occurred to me how it takes so little to celebrateBack home we only acknowledged big eventsI know whyBirthdays weren’t among the big events         But funerals were. And… Read more

Share Button
Read full story Comments { 0 }

Paint the Quad poetry

When I was an undergrad many years ago my favorite expression with friends was, “Let’s go paint the town red” and red we did paint wherever we ended up. We were in touch with the spirit of freedom, a little bit of anarchy and tons of creativity. College, especially,  inspired that kind of liberty…. Read more

Share Button
Read full story Comments { 0 }

The marriage of movement and stillness

I’m driving to Craggy Gardens when a baby bear leaps out of the woods on the right side of the Blue Ridge Parkway. I’m not driving fast on the snaking, hairpin bends, so it’s easy to slow down and watch the little black bear. I’m excited because it’s the first time I’m seeing a bear…. Read more

Share Button
Read full story Comments { 1 }
>